The Entomological Society of NSW

The Entomological Society of NSW

The Entomological Society of NSW

Current volume 51 (Public)

Contents Vol. 51 (Public)

These papers are currently only available to members of the Entomological Society of New South Wales, or directly from the author. Once the entire Journal 50 is published they will also be available through Informit. They will be made freely available to all via this website once volume 51 is published in its entirety (approximately one year later).  Members should log in from the main menu (found under Membership drop-down menu) to access these papers.

GENERAL AND APPLIED ENTOMOLOGY

The Journal of the Entomological Society of New South Wales Inc.

VOLUME 51

CONTENTS

Some larval host plants for Aphanasium australe (Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae: Aphanasini): Ptoteacae appear to be the sole larval hosts for this tribe

Webb, G. A.

The range of larval host plants for Aphanasium australe (Boisduval) is expanded to include several species of Grevillea in the Sydney region. Adult A. australe were reared from several species of Grevillea, G. buxifolia (Sm.) R.Br., G. oleoides Sieber ex Schult. & Schult., G. sericea (Sm.) R.Br. and G. speciosa (Knight) McGill. An additional record for Hakea sericea Schrad. & J.C.Wendl. is provided. In Hakea, A. australe has been found to infest the stems and roots but in Grevillea, it appears to be confined to infestation of the root system. The only known larval host records for Aphanasium spp. are Hakea and Grevillea (Proteaceae).

General and Applied Entomology 51: 1-4 (published on-line 11.1.2023)

 

DNA barcode identification of Australian collected mushroom fly Coboldia fuscipes (Meigen, 1830) (Scatopsidae: Diptera)

Nguyen, D.T., Chen, Y. & Herron, G.A.

Mushroom fly Coboldia fuscipes was recently found contaminating Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute (EMAI) insectary cultures. Species identification secured via DNA barcoding was followed by phylogenetic analysis to determine the phylogenetic relationship of this introduced pest. We found that DNA barcodes of EMAI-collected C. fuscipes were matched to North American accessions of the species, which might imply a Nearctic rather than Palearctic source origin of the pest in Australia.

General and Applied Entomology 51: 5-7 (published on-line 11.1.2023)